The 9 Hallmarks of Aging

A “hallmark” is used as an indicating mark. When we think of the normal aging process, many think of the change in physical appearance, stamina, or brain function. While this is true, we are looking at biological age versus chronological age. Biological age takes into account what your age is at the cellular level.

Aging at the cellular level is a complex process that is not fully understood. However, the 9 hallmarks of aging can provide us with a framework to better understand the aging process and age-related diseases.

the 9 hallmarks of aging

Some of these hallmarks are easily addressable, while others are not. But, by understanding the hallmarks of aging, we can develop strategies to target the aging process and improve our health as we age.

What Are The 9 Hallmarks of Aging?

The nine hallmarks of aging include genomic instability, telomere attrition, epigenetic alterations, loss of proteostasis, deregulated nutrient sensing, mitochondrial dysfunction, cellular senescence, stem cell exhaustion, and altered intercellular communication.

1. Genomic Instability:

As we age, our cells accumulate more DNA damage. This can lead to changes in gene expression, which can lead to the development of age-related diseases.

2. Telomere Attrition:

Telomeres are the protective caps at the end of our chromosomes. They shorten as we age, and this can lead to genomic instability and cell death.

3. Epigenetic Alterations:

As we age, our cells accumulate epigenetic alterations, which are changes in gene expression that are not caused by changes in the DNA sequence. These alterations can contribute to the development of age-related diseases.

4. Loss of Proteostasis:

Proteostasis is the ability of a cell to maintain the correct folding and function of its proteins. As we age, our cells lose proteostasis, which can lead to the development of age-related diseases.

5. Deregulated Nutrient Sensing:

As we age, our cells become less efficient at sensing and responding to changes in nutrient availability. This can lead to the development of age-related diseases.

6. Mitochondrial Dysfunction:

Mitochondria are the powerhouses of our cells, and they begin to dysfunction as we age. Mitochondria are responsible for turning glucose into energy. As we age, less energy is produced, making our cells slower and more lethargic.

7. Cellular Senescence:

As we age, our cells enter a state of senescence, which is characterized by reduced proliferation and increased cell death. Senescent cells can secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines, which can contribute to the development of diseases and the production of “zombie cells” – cells that will infect and destroy the surrounding ones.

8. Stem Cell Exhaustion:

As we age, our stem cells become exhausted and are no longer able to replenish other cell types. This can lead to the deterioration of tissue function and the development of age-related diseases.

9. Altered Intercellular Communication:

As we age, the communication between our cells becomes altered. This can lead to the development of age-related diseases.

How can you test for the hallmarks of age?

There is no definitive test for all nine hallmarks of aging. However, there are several tests that can be used to measure some hallmarks. For example, telomere length can be measured using a blood test, and epigenetic alterations can be measured using a DNA methylation test.

DNA Methylation test:

This test can measure epigenetic alterations in DNA. An epigenetic alteration is a change in gene expression that is not caused by changes in the DNA sequence. The test involves taking a blood sample and sending it to a laboratory for analysis. The results of the test can be used to determine if there are any epigenetic alterations in DNA.

Blood Test:

This test can measure telomere length. A telomere is a protective cap at the end of a chromosome. Telomeres shorten as we age, and this can lead to genomic instability and cell death.

Proteostasis Test:

This test can measure the ability of a cell to maintain protein function. Doctors test for this by taking a sample of blood or skin and sending it to a laboratory for analysis. The results of the test can be used to determine if proteostasis is impaired.

Mitochondrial Function Test:

This test can measure mitochondrial function. To test to make sure these “powerhouse of the cells” are functioning properly, doctors can take a muscle biopsy. The results of the test can be used to determine if there is mitochondrial dysfunction.

Cellular Senescence Test:

A cellular senescence test is used to measure the presence of senescent cells. Senescent cells are cells that have stopped dividing and are no longer able to replenish other cells. Senescent cells are also known as “Zombie Cells”. To test for this, doctors can take a sample of blood or skin and send it to a laboratory for analysis. The results of the test can be used to determine if there are any senescent cells present.

Stem Cell Function Test:

This test can measure stem cell function. Stem cells are responsible for replenishing other cell types. To test for this, doctors can take a sample of blood or bone marrow and send it to a laboratory for analysis. The results of the test can be used to determine if stem cell function is impaired.

Intercellular Communication Test:

This test can measure intercellular communication. Intercellular communication is important for the coordination of cell function. To test for this, doctors can take a sample of blood or skin and send it to a laboratory for analysis. The results of the test can be used to determine if intercellular communication is impaired.

What Are Stem Cells?

Stem cells are a type of cell that has the ability to self-renew and differentiate into other types of cells.

There are two types of stem cells:

1) embryonic stem cells, which come from embryos, and

2) adult stem cells, which are found in adults.

Embryonic stem cells have the ability to differentiate into any type of cell in the body, while adult stem cells are more restricted and can only differentiate into a few types of cells. As we get older, our stem cells become less effective at repairing damaged tissue. This results in a decline in our ability to heal from injuries and diseases.  

What Are Some Interventions That Target the 9 Hallmarks of Aging?

There are many potential interventions that target the hallmarks of aging. This means that they can disrupt, slow, or even reverse the effects of these hallmarks. The interventions come in the form of a variety of therapies or supplements.

Some of these include telomere lengthening therapies, epigenetic therapies, proteostasis-targeting therapies, mitochondrial-targeting therapies, senolytic therapies, and stem cell therapies.

It is important to note that not all of these interventions are currently available, and some are still in the early stages of development.

What is the Best Way to Prevent the 9 Hallmarks of Aging?

There is no definitive answer to this question. However, some lifestyle interventions that have been shown to target the hallmarks of aging include exercise, a healthy diet, and stress reduction. Additionally, there are some supplements that have been shown to target specific hallmarks of aging, such as telomere lengthening supplements, cellular senescence fighting supplements, and mitochondrial-supporting supplements.

How Does Cellular Aging Reflect in Physical Appearance?

There are many ways that cellular aging can be reflected in physical appearance. One way is through the development of wrinkles and fine lines. This is due to the loss of collagen and elastin, which are proteins that help keep skin firm and elastic. Another way is through the development of age spots, which are due to the accumulation of damaged cells and the loss of pigment-producing cells. Additionally, cellular aging can lead to thinning hair and dry skin. Finally, cellular aging can impact the immune system, which can lead to a decline in physical appearance.

What Are Some Common Signs of Aging?

Some common signs of aging include wrinkles, fine lines, age spots, thinning hair, dry skin, and a decline in physical appearance. Additionally, cellular aging can impact the immune system, which can lead to a decline in physical appearance.

Are There Supplements Available to Combat the 9 Hallmarks of Aging?

Yes, there are many supplements that have been shown to target specific hallmarks of aging. Dosage and customization are very important to make sure the supplements are right for your body. There is no one-size-fits-all treatment when it comes to the human body. Each body is unique, with a unique set of variables to consider.

Combilytics Corp has a supplement regimen that works with your body to combat the nine hallmarks of aging. EternLX is tailored to what your body needs based on lab testing and review.

Contact Combilytics Corp Today

If you have questions about biological age and how the nine hallmarks of aging could be affecting your body, contact them today at info@combilytics.com. Get tested to see what your biological age is down to the cellular level and how you can work to reverse that clock from the inside out using the right supplementation specialized for your body.